Read Lightning, Including: Thunderbolt, Whistler (Radio), Ball Lightning, Heat Lightning, Fulgurite, Astraphobia, Lichtenberg Figure, Lightning A[ LIGHTNING, INCLUDING: THUNDERBOLT, WHISTLER (RADIO), BALL LIGHTNING, HEAT LIGHTNING, FULGURITE, ASTRAPHOBIA, LICHTENBERG FIGURE, LIGHTNING A ] by Hephaestus Books (Author ) on Sep-11-2011 Paperback by Hephaestus Books Online

Title : Lightning, Including: Thunderbolt, Whistler (Radio), Ball Lightning, Heat Lightning, Fulgurite, Astraphobia, Lichtenberg Figure, Lightning A[ LIGHTNING, INCLUDING: THUNDERBOLT, WHISTLER (RADIO), BALL LIGHTNING, HEAT LIGHTNING, FULGURITE, ASTRAPHOBIA, LICHTENBERG FIGURE, LIGHTNING A ] by Hephaestus Books (Author ) on Sep-11-2011 Paperback
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : B00EEUF746
ISBN13 : -
Format Type : Paperback
Language : Deutsch
Publisher : Hephaestus Books 11 September 2011
Number of Pages : 294 Pages
File Size : 965 KB
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Lightning, Including: Thunderbolt, Whistler (Radio), Ball Lightning, Heat Lightning, Fulgurite, Astraphobia, Lichtenberg Figure, Lightning A[ LIGHTNING, INCLUDING: THUNDERBOLT, WHISTLER (RADIO), BALL LIGHTNING, HEAT LIGHTNING, FULGURITE, ASTRAPHOBIA, LICHTENBERG FIGURE, LIGHTNING A ] by Hephaestus Books (Author ) on Sep-11-2011 Paperback Reviews

  • Peter Berlin
    2019-04-15 01:15

    I had heard so much about this supposedly wonderful novel so I finally gor round to reading it. I dion`t know what happened but somehow I never got into it. I found it rather long, repetitve and actually boring. Although this book is llegedly be one of the greatest novels ever written by a Finn or anyone else, I cannot really agree with that.I found it really long-winded – thouigh I do like big fat novels. I am a great admirer of Micherner`s novels and they they never stop at 1000 pages.Zhe period that is covered int his novel is really interesting as well so I cannot explain why everybody else seems to rave along and I just don`t get it. I will give the author another try with another novel, but this one clearly did not do it for me. I jsut found it way too slow and it never grabbed my imagination. I did not even finish reading it, which is rare form e, so I can only give this novel 2 stars.

  • RHP
    2019-04-12 03:30

    Ich habe mir zwei "Bücher" von Hephaestus bestellt. Ich schreibe "Bücher", weil es sich eigentlich um dünne Heftchen handelt, die im Wesentlichen Wikipedia-Artikel enthalten. Nochmal, WIKIPEDIA-ARTIKEL, mehr oder minder zusammenhängend angeordnet, schwarzweiß gedruckt und das für gegen Geld (?!??).Das Preis-Leistungsverhältnis bezeichne ich als absurd, ein Stern ist noch zuviel.

  • John LeBlanc
    2019-04-14 03:11

    I have an "all region" DVD player and now shop in Europe for all the DVDs not available in the US!

  • None
    2019-04-17 00:21

    If one reads no other novel by a Finn, one must read Waltari's "The Egyptian." It is arguably the greatest work of Finnish literature in much the same way that Dvorak's New World Symphony is arguably the greatest work of Czech music. Each brings a national influence to what has essentially been an international masterpiece from its very inception. An American bestseller for a period after its first publication in English, The Egyptian has remained stubbornly popular throughout Europe with every new generation of literate readers.Mika Waltari was a prolific and versatile writer whose historical fiction, of which The Egyptian is the premiere and defining opus, treats the great turning points of world history with a voice and perspective that bring to mind the sweep of a James Michener, the gently ironic familiarity of a Mark Twain, and the authorial presence of a William Faulkner.The Egyptian ostensibly relates the autobiography of Sinuhe, a baby boy found in a basket among bullrushes who rises to become a doctor and advisor to pharaohs, during the coming of age and regency of the pharaoh Ekhnaton, who attempted to overturn established religions and replace them with a new one worshiping a new god. (Waltari contrives to make this element of the plot vaguely suggestive of the birth of Christianity more than a millennium later.) Through his travails and his travels, Sinuhe meets people of all stations of life in many areas of Egypt and its neighboring countries, informing us on many details both grand and minute of ancient Egyptian life and history.But the true genius of The Egyptian is that it is really not about Egypt or ancient times at all. Rather it is about every nation and every civilization, every people in every time in every place of the world. It is about each of us readers, the joys and sorrows of our own lives, and about the social and governmental institutions to which we find ourselves subject. He records with dispassionate clarity the entire spectrum of human and social behavior, from the most exalted of aspirations, emotions, and deeds to the most debased, in himself as unflinchingly as in others. Whoever we are, wherever and whenever we live, we cannot help but recognize ourselves and our own times.Most endearing of all is the voice in which Sinuhe addresses us. By turns grave and common, earnest and witty, naïve and sly, it cannot be captured in a brief review. However, this personal translation from Finnish of the opening paragraph may provide a taste:"I, Sinuhe, son of Senmut and his wife Kipa, am the author of this work. I write not to glorify the gods, for I am weary of gods. I write not to glorify pharaohs, for I am weary of pharaohs' deeds. Rather for my own sake do I write this. Not to flatter gods, nor to flatter kings, nor out of fear, nor out of hope for the future. For I have experienced and lost much in the years of my life, and am untroubled by trivial fears; and I am weary of the hope of immortality, as I am weary of gods and kings. Only for my own sake do I write this, and in that respect I believe that I am different from all other writers past and future." [Paragraph excerpted and translated under fair usage provision of international copyright law for the purpose of literary review.]If I could carry with me through life only a single novel as an enduring source of inspiration and sound perspective, I would mourn the loss of many others - but I would choose The Egyptian.

  • None
    2019-03-30 03:15

    While impressed with how skillfully and casually Waltari draws upon an astonishing number of details about daily life in ancient times, I at first wondered if this book was going anywhere or had anything worthwhile to say. As the protagonist returns to Egypt from his journeys and finds himself caught up in a battle between the supporters of the gods Aton and Ammon, I realized this is that rare book that works on many levels - it's an adventure, a love story, a story of political intrigue and religious faith. Its overarching theme is the constant conflict, both in society and in the soul of the protagonist, the physician Sinuhe, between naïve idealism and cynical pragmatism.My only complaint is that, even while the book feels incredibly accurate, Waltari goes beyond merely filling in the major historical facts with fictions of his own; rather, in many instances he contradicts them. For instance, in the novel Akhnaton is immediately succeeded by Tutankhamun because the heir apparent, Sekhenre, is murdered. In fact, after Akhnaton's death, Nefertiti and Smenkhkare ruled for several years before Tutankhamun ascended to the throne. Another example is how in the novel Horemheb's army defeats the Israelites and destroys their Arc of the Covenant, even though historical sources suggest it was still around when the Romans sacked the Temple of Jerusalem in 70 a.d. But those minor issues aside, this book is entertaining, informative, and thought-provoking.

  • None
    2019-04-21 04:25

    Mika Waltari is, so far, the only Finn whose books I've read. Besides Sinuhe, the Egyptian, I've also read Turms, der Unsterbliche (Turms, the Immortal), Johannes Angelos, and Kuka Murhasi Rouva Skrofin (who murdered Mrs. Skrof). My favorites are Sinuhe and Johannes Angelos, but the others were good, too. I'm now reading Komisario Palmun Erehdys (Inspector Palmu's Mistake), which is a sequel to Kuka Murhasi Rouva Skrofin.Sinuhe, the Egyptian, is really typical, I think, of Waltari's historical novels. It's really neat how he provides an interesting history of Egypt, but still writes a really good novel at the same time. I like Waltari's heroes because they always learn the hard way about women and honesty. I think he's just as cynical as I am, maybe more so from his longer lifetime experience which he had. I have the impression that most people only care about his historical portrayal of Egypt, but I think it's the story and the sad irony which makes it one of my favorites.