Read Tales of the Dogs: A Celebration of the Irish and Their Greyhounds by John Martin Online

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The definitive chronicle of greyhounds in Ireland both on the track and in the field and their influence at home and abroad, featuring over 120 photographs and illustrations.Ireland is the home of the greyhound with the best breeders, owners and trainers, the story of the Irish and their dogs in an extraordinary one Ever since the coursing triumphs of Master M Grath in the nineteenth century and Mick the Miller s days as the first legend of the race track at the start of the twentieth, Irish greyhounds have led the pack.Illustrated with over 120 photographs, many never published before, Tales of the Dogs is a comprehensive and lively chronicle of greyhounds in Ireland, both on the track and in the field, and includes the first ever detailed look at the administration of the sport in Ireland, from the first race at Celtic Park in Belfast to the current time, when the sport is a multi million euro industry.Tales of the Dogs is packed with information, stories and memories, from portraits of the characters who have made their mark on the sport and the most famous winners of all the Classic races, to the current great dogs, the new tracks and everything that makes greyhound racing one of Ireland s best loved and most popular sports....

Title : Tales of the Dogs: A Celebration of the Irish and Their Greyhounds
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 085640845X
ISBN13 : 978-0856408458
Format Type : Other Book
Language : Englisch
Publisher : Blackstaff Press Ltd 5 September 2009
Number of Pages : 100 Pages
File Size : 785 KB
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Tales of the Dogs: A Celebration of the Irish and Their Greyhounds Reviews

  • Mi Wi
    2019-03-01 10:17

    This book contains a very good background to the sport of greyhound racing in Ireland. Historical facts on famous dogs and trainers. Some very rare photos are in it as well. Simply a MUST HAVE for the enthusiast of the sport!

  • Peter Durward Harris
    2019-02-26 06:09

    Lavishly illustrated, this book begins by looking briefly at the origins of dog racing and of the greyhound itself. Coursing was the first form of the sport to be formally recognized, its most prestigious trophy being the Waterloo Cup that was staged annually near Liverpool each year until British legislation prevented its continuation after the 2005 event. (The legislation was primarily brought in to outlaw foxhunting, but also outlawed coursing.) Long before then, track racing (an American invention) had become the most popular form of greyhound racing in both Britain and Ireland.The author traces the development of greyhound racing in Ireland, providing comparisons with greyhound racing in Britain and with horse racing. The most striking difference these days is in the level of state funding. In particular, the author gives a long list of British tracks that have closed, some of which were regarded as major tracks in their time. Most of them could have remained open with Irish levels of funding, but I can't imagine the British public ever endorsing such generous funding for any sport. The biggest loss was White City, once the site of an Olympic Games and later the location for the English Greyhound Derby; it was subsequently redeveloped for the BBC. The Derby was moved to Wimbledon.Another striking difference between Britain and Ireland is that in Britain, the system is that trainers are contracted to their local tracks. Their dogs always run at those tracks unless they reach the top grade, when they are allowed to compete in open competition. Irish greyhound racing operates like horse racing in both countries, with trainers able to run their horses wherever they can find suitable races for them. On reflection, I can see the appeal of the British system that at first glance seems odd, which guarantees dogs for races (so there are no walkovers) and races for dogs (so suitable races are always available for each dog). Unless a dog is good enough, why bother with all the extra travelling anyway? However, Ireland's more orthodox system also works well and it appears to be both competitive and successful.Most of the book focuses on the great dogs, the great trainers, the races they won and the tracks they raced at. It will surprise nobody with a knowledge of Irish greyhound history that Master M'Grath (the 19th century coursing champion), Mick the Miller (the champion racer in the late twenties and early thirties) and Spanish Battleship (a champion racer of the mid-fifties) are the dogs that get the most coverage. One of the curious aspects of the sport is that no less than fourteen events are now officially listed as Irish greyhound racing classics. This devalues the term somewhat, but no more so than calling a second-tier league a championship, as now happens in English football.Scattered through the book is an A to Z of greyhound racing, with brief pieces for each letter.. X is for Xenophobia, which insofar as it affected the sport (at the breeding stud) is now supposedly a thing of the past. More interesting is V for Veterinary, which mentions a disease that badly affected the sport in Ireland for a while. Other good ones include C for cigarette cards and T for triple dead heat. But was it desperation that drove the author to use two letters for racing jackets? J is for Jackets and Y is for Yellow, which Ireland stopped using when they decided to adopt the British system of red, blue, white, black, orange and black-and-white stripes.The main flaw in the book is that a fair bit of space is devoted to discussing the officials who served at various times on the boards of the organizations that oversee the sport in Ireland. While the creation and subsequent involvement of those organizations is interesting up to a point, I felt that the name-dropping became rather tedious, hence four stars rather than five. Fortunately, there are plenty of good reasons for anybody interested in greyhound racing to read this otherwise excellent book.

  • Rob the Cook
    2019-03-19 09:35

    best book on the subject I have ever seen. My father totally loved it - even went to Ireland after to see the real deal.

  • Peter Durward Harris
    2019-03-16 09:38

    Lavishly illustrated, this book begins by looking briefly at the origins of dog racing and of the greyhound itself. Coursing was the first form of the sport to be formally recognized, its most prestigious trophy being the Waterloo Cup that was staged annually near Liverpool each year until British legislation prevented its continuation after the 2005 event. (The legislation was primarily brought in to outlaw foxhunting, but also outlawed coursing.) Long before then, track racing (an American invention) had become the most popular form of greyhound racing in both Britain and Ireland.The author traces the development of greyhound racing in Ireland, providing comparisons with greyhound racing in Britain and with horse racing. The most striking difference these days is in the level of state funding. In particular, the author gives a long list of British tracks that have closed, some of which were regarded as major tracks in their time. Most of them could have remained open with Irish levels of funding, but I can't imagine the British public ever endorsing such generous funding for any sport. The biggest loss was White City, once the site of an Olympic Games and later the location for the English Greyhound Derby; it was subsequently redeveloped for the BBC. The Derby was moved to Wimbledon.Another striking difference between Britain and Ireland is that in Britain, the system is that trainers are contracted to their local tracks. Their dogs always run at those tracks unless they reach the top grade, when they are allowed to compete in open competition. Irish greyhound racing operates like horse racing in both countries, with trainers able to run their horses wherever they can find suitable races for them. On reflection, I can see the appeal of the British system that at first glance seems odd, which guarantees dogs for races (so there are no walkovers) and races for dogs (so suitable races are always available for each dog). Unless a dog is good enough, why bother with all the extra travelling anyway? However, Ireland's more orthodox system also works well and it appears to be both competitive and successful.Most of the book focuses on the great dogs, the great trainers, the races they won and the tracks they raced at. It will surprise nobody with a knowledge of Irish greyhound history that Master M'Grath (the 19th century coursing champion), Mick the Miller (the champion racer in the late twenties and early thirties) and Spanish Battleship (a champion racer of the mid-fifties) are the dogs that get the most coverage. One of the curious aspects of the sport is that no less than fourteen events are now officially listed as Irish greyhound racing classics. This devalues the term somewhat, but no more so than calling a second-tier league a championship, as now happens in English football.Scattered through the book is an A to Z of greyhound racing, with brief pieces for each letter.. X is for Xenophobia, which insofar as it affected the sport (at the breeding stud) is now supposedly a thing of the past. More interesting is V for Veterinary, which mentions a disease that badly affected the sport in Ireland for a while. Other good ones include C for cigarette cards and T for triple dead heat. But was it desperation that drove the author to use two letters for racing jackets? J is for Jackets and Y is for Yellow, which Ireland stopped using when they decided to adopt the British system of red, blue, white, black, orange and black-and-white stripes.The main flaw in the book is that a fair bit of space is devoted to discussing the officials who served at various times on the boards of the organizations that oversee the sport in Ireland. While the creation and subsequent involvement of those organizations is interesting up to a point, I felt that the name-dropping became rather tedious, hence four stars rather than five. Fortunately, there are plenty of good reasons for anybody interested in greyhound racing to read this otherwise excellent book.

  • Bob
    2019-03-19 06:35

    I have a friend who is into greyhound racing and is always on about them so when I was offered this book free by the publishers I grabbed it in the hope of learning something about greyhound racing, in fact I learnt more than I expected.The book is as you would expect from the title very Irish but also covers the history fairly briefly from 2291 (approx) BC to the present day. The actual book is a well produced hardback with over 120 pages and printed on good quality gloss paper.Strangely although the book is very detailed and covers most of the prominent Irish trainers and dogs I found the green rectangles giving A to Z facts on greyhounds most interesting and learnt a lot from them.Some of the information is for the diehard enthusiast for example there are complete lists of winners and their winning times at several races from 1932 to 2009. For example the winner of the Irish St Leger in 1985 at Limerick was Ballintubber One in a time of 30.42 seconds.In summary a superb book if you have an interest in Irish greyhound racing but perhaps a bit specialised for the rest of us.